Food and Mood – Focus on Taste Texture and Smell

Updated: 5 days ago



Julie, our registered associate nutritionist, focuses on how food can affect our mood.


Whilst it is widely known that nutrition plays a key role in our physical health, it also directly affects our emotional well-being too…. Our brains are responsible for processing information fed to them by our five senses, and interpreting how we see, feel, hear, taste and smell. This can have a direct impact on our well-being.

Taste and smell – are very much linked, and around 80% of what our brain interprets as a taste sensation comes from our sense of smell. As we are all aware, we can experience salty, sweet, bitter, sour, or savoury, so how can these lead to wellbeing? The smell is often associated with pleasure or displeasure.

Texture – foods with great texture are thought to be more satisfying to eat. Eating crunchy foods such as crisps or raw vegetables relieves stress and listening to yourself munching away on the textural element makes the experience more enjoyable. On the other hand, texture can be a cause of being a picky eater too, this can be due to mouthfeel and plays a role in the acceptance of foods in both children and adults.

Flavour – the flavour of food can have a direct impact on our food choice, for example, something spicy can release dopamine, a chemical in the brain that influences mood and feelings of reward and motivation, whilst sweetness can play a powerful role in feelings of calmness.

If you are interested in finding out more, take a look here: https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/tips-for-everyday-living/food-and-mood/about-food-and-mood/

Why not book a free 15-minute discovery call with Julie today to talk about your individual requirements? About


Julie is an Associate Registered Nutritionist and believes in providing a personalised approach to her clients to help them reach their health and lifestyle goals. Julie has experience working with clients on a one to one basis to support digestive disorders, weight management and women’s health, in addition, Julie is a qualified chef and lecturer, and is able to support clients with their culinary skills, education and training.


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